2012 federal skilled worker program for tradespeople

In our other article, we explained the many different ways of applying for permanent residence.

The new list of Federal Skilled Worker (Category 1) will be out soon and the Government of Canada is expected to update this skilled worker program category by providing for a separate stream for trade occupations coming from these sectors;

  • Construction
  • Transportation
  • manufacturing
  • service industry

We will publish more information and articles about this new separate stream.  Be sure to follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/ICANimmigration) or Facebook (www.facebook.com/ican.immigration) for updates.

You can also send us your resume for free assessment of your qualifications vice this new stream by email to info@icaninc.ca with subject line (“Tradespeople/elg/newstream”) or call us at Tel. No. 905­564-­9931

 

By ICAN Inc.

Coming to Canada: Temporarily, or Permanently

By Eman Galang

 

Coming to Canada entails answering the question “do you want to come to Canada temporarily, or you want to stay in Canada on a permanent basis”.

Persons who are not Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Canada may require a visa to enter Canada. The visa may be a temporary resident visa, or a permanent resident visa.

Temporary Resident Visa

A Temporary Resident Visa (TRV) is an official document issued by a Canadian visa office that is placed in your passport to show that you have met the requirements for admission to Canada as a temporary resident. 

When you enter Canada as temporary resident, you are given a temporary resident status for a limited period of time allowing you to remain in Canada during the period authorized for your stay.

Temporary residents are classified as; 

  • Visitor;
  • Student; or
  • Worker

In order to obtain a TRV (whether as a visitor, student, or worker), you must show the officer that you meet the requirements of Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations and that you will be in Canada for a temporary stay.

You must also: 

  • satisfy an officer that you will leave Canada at the end of your stay,
  • show that you have enough money to maintain yourself and your family members in Canada and to return home,
  • not intend to work or study in Canada unless authorized to do so,
  • be law abiding and have no record of criminal activity,
  • not be a risk to the security of Canada,
  • provide any additional document requested by the officer to establish your admissibility, and
  • be in good health (complete a medical examination if required).

In reaching a decision whether the applicant is a genuine TRV applicant, the visa officer considers several factors, which include: 

  • the applicant’s travel and identity documents;
  • the reason for travel to Canada and the applicant’s contacts there;
  • the applicant’s financial means for the trip;
  • the applicant’s ties to his or her country of residence, including immigration status, employment and family ties;
  • whether the applicant would be likely to leave Canada at the end of the authorized stay;
  • the applicant’s health condition.

Officers make decisions on a case-by-case basis. The onus is on applicants to show that their intentions are genuine.

If you are granted a visitor TRV – you should not work or study in Canada and you must not remain in Canada longer than the period authorized for your stay.

If you are a granted a student TRV (or study permit) – you should not work in Canada (unless given a work TRV) and you should not change the type of your studies, educational institution, location of studies, or times and periods of studies without applying to change these conditions on your study permit if they were specified on your study permit.  Also, you must not remain in Canada longer than the period authorized for your stay.

If you are granted a work TRV (or work permit) – you should not study in Canada (unless given a study TRV) and you should not change employers, type of work, or location of work without applying to change these conditions if they were specified on your work permit. Also, you must not remain in Canada longer than the period authorized for your stay.

You may have your period of authorized stay in Canada extended, or your conditions of entry changed.

For example, if you have come to visit family and wish to stay longer for a special reason, such as a wedding, you may be allowed to extend your stay. This is possible only if you apply before the end of your authorized stay. To obtain a visitor TRV extension, you will need to apply at least 30 days before the expiry of your authorized stay.

Normally, you are not allowed to change your status once you are in Canada. For example, a tourist cannot accept a job or become a student. Check the conditions on your work or study permit (if you obtained one). If you wish to change the conditions (for example, if you want to change employers), you must apply for a new work or study TRV.

In essence, a TRV allows you to temporarily stay or reside in Canada during a specific period of time only and you must follow the conditions of your stay. Conditions may be specified on your visitor record or your study or work permit.

In some cases, after some period of being a work TRV or study TRV holder, you may qualify to apply for a permanent resident visa (see discussions below on Canadian Experience Class, and Live In Caregiver Class).

 

Permanent Resident Visa

A permanent resident is someone who has acquired permanent resident status by immigrating to Canada, but is not yet a Canadian citizen. Permanent residents have rights and privileges in Canada even though they remain citizens of their home country. In order to maintain permanent resident status, they must fulfill specified residency obligations.

A person in Canada temporarily, such as visitor, international student (study TRV holder), or a temporary foreign worker (work TRV holder), as explained above is not a permanent resident.

As a permanent resident, you and your dependants have the right:

  • To receive most social benefits that Canadian citizens receive, including health care coverage.
  • To live, work or study anywhere in Canada (without any conditions given to TRV holder)
  • To apply for Canadian citizenship
  • To protection under Canadian law and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

As a permanent resident, you must pay taxes, and respect all Canadian laws at the federal, provincial and municipal levels.

Your permanent resident status allows you to live in Canada, but there is also a time limit on how long you can live outside the country. To keep your status as a permanent resident, you must live in Canada for at least two years within a five-year period.

When you become a Canadian citizen, you are no longer a permanent resident.

There are different ways of applying for permanent residence, some examples are;

1. Federal Skilled Worker Class – Applications for Permanent Residence under the Federal Skilled Worker Class can be submitted by foreign nationals who are skilled workers and professionals.  Canada encourages skilled worker applications for Permanent Residence from people with skills, education and work experience that will contribute to the Canadian economy.  This type of application is further divided into three categories;

Category 1 – You can apply for FSW Category 1 if you have at least 1 year of continuous full time or equivalent paid work experience in the last ten years in at least one of the occupational categories identified in the Ministerial Instructions called the eligible occupations.

Category 2 – You can apply for FSW Category 2 if you have an offer of arranged employment in Canada. The employment offer should be in writing, indeterminate in duration, and meet the arranged employment factor described in this guide.

Category 3 – You can apply for FSW Category 3 if you are an international student currently enrolled in a doctoral (PhD) program, delivered by a recognized post-secondary educational institution located in Canada, or you have completed a PhD program from a recognized post-secondary educational institution located in Canada no more than 12 months before your application is received by the Government of Canada.

A grant of FSW PRV does not mean that you will have a ready job once you come to Canada, it only means that you can stay permanently in Canada to live, work or study anywhere in Canada (without any conditions given to TRV holder).

2. Business Class – Canada welcomes successful business people who are seeking new opportunities and challenges. The Business Immigration Program is designed to encourage and facilitate the admission of these individuals to become permanent residents of Canada. Both the federal and provincial/territorial governments welcome business immigrants and offer services to help immigrants start a business and settle in Canada.

3. Provincial Nominees – The Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) allows provincial governments to choose immigrants according to the economic needs of the province. Each province establishes its own standards and processes by which it chooses its nominees and tries to nominate those candidates who would be most likely to settle effectively into the economic and social life of the region.  Before you can apply to immigrate to Canada as a provincial nominee, you must first be nominated by a province or territory. Each province or territory has its own application and nomination procedures. However, the federal government of Canada (ie., Citizenship and Immigration Canada or CIC) retains the authority to make the final decision on an application for permanent residence using existing selection and admissibility criteria, including security, criminal, and medical components for candidates who hold Provincial Nominee Certificates.

4. Family Class (parents, grandparents, adopted children and other family members) – The Canadian government allows citizens and permanent residents of Canada to sponsor members of the family class, but it requires that arriving immigrants receive care and support from their sponsors.  Members of the family class include a sponsor’s spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner; a dependent child of the sponsor; the sponsor’s mother or father; a person the sponsor intends to adopt; and other relatives of the sponsor as defined by regulation.

This application is for persons who wish to be re-united with close family members in Canada. In order to use this application package, you must, with respect to the sponsor, be

  • his or her father or mother,
  • his or her grandfather or grandmother,
  • a child he or she adopted outside Canada or intends to adopt in Canada,
  • his or her brother, sister, nephew, niece, grandson or granddaughter, and be an orphan, under the age of 18 and not a spouse or common-law partner,
  • his or her relative, regardless of your age, if the sponsor does not have a spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, son, daughter, mother, father, brother, sister, grandfather, grandmother, uncle, aunt, nephew or niece, who is a Canadian citizen, Indian or permanent resident or whose application for permanent residence in Canada he or she could sponsor.

5. Family class (spouses, partners and dependent children) – The Canadian government knows it is important to help families who come from other countries to reunite in Canada. If your spouse, partner, or parent is a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada, he or she may sponsor you as his or her spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, dependent child (including adopted child) so you can become a permanent resident.

If you are being sponsored as a member of the family class, your spouse or common-law partner (except where your spouse or common-law partner is the sponsor) must be included in your application as a family member. You must also include all your dependent children from your current and previous relationships, whether they will be going with you to Canada (accompanying family members) or not (non-accompanying family members).

All your family members, whether accompanying you or not, must be declared on your application and be examined. If family members are not examined, it is generally not possible to sponsor them at a later date. This includes children in the custody of a former spouse or common-law partner.

In addition, failure to declare family members on your application and have them examined goes against your duty to provide truthful and accurate information, and may cause you to be found inadmissible to Canada.

6. Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian Protected Persons Abroad – Canada’s humanitarian tradition of offering protection to displaced and persecuted people is known around the world. Each year, Canadians assist refugees and other persecuted people to rebuild their lives in Canada. In order to be eligible for resettlement from abroad as a refugee, you must be a member of one of the following classes: 

  • Convention Refugees Abroad (The word “Convention” refers to the United Nations convention relating to the Status of Refugees); or 
  • Humanitarian-Protected Persons Abroad (Country of Asylum Class) – The Country of Asylum Class is Canada’s response to the resettlement needs of people in refugee like situations who do not qualify as Convention Refugees.

In addition, you must demonstrate an ability to re-establish your life in Canada and pass medical, security and criminality assessments.

7. Canadian Experience Class – Temporary Foreign Workers (work TRV holder) and Students who graduated with a Canadian educational credential (study TRV holder), often have the qualities to make a successful transition from temporary to permanent resident status in Canada. They are familiar with Canadian society and can contribute to the Canadian economy. If you are a Temporary Foreign Worker or a foreign graduate working in Canada, you may apply for permanent residence by using this application package. You should have knowledge of English or French and qualifying work experience.

Applications for Permanent Residence under the Canadian Experience Class can be submitted by: 

  • Temporary foreign workers; or
  • Foreign graduates with a Canadian educational credential.

In addition, applicants must have Canadian work experience in a managerial, professional, skilled trade or technical occupation.

8. Live-in Caregiver Class – A live-in caregiver is a person who was given a work TRV (specifically, live in caregiver work permit) to work as a live-in caregiver for children, seniors or the disabled to an employer in Canada. To apply for permanent residence under this class, you must have completed a certain length of authorized full-time live in caregiver work within 4 years from the date you entered Canada. 

You may apply for this type of application for permanent residence if; 

  • You have completed 24 months OR 3,900 hours (within a minimum of 22 months which may include a maximum of 390 hours of overtime) of authorized full-time employment as a live-in caregiver within four years from the date of your entry in Canada under the Live-in Caregiver Program; and
  • You lived in your employer’s home or the home of the person(s) receiving care in Canada while being employed as a live-in caregiver.

In sum, becoming a PR gives you the benefits of receiving most social benefits that Canadian citizens receive, including health care coverage, education, etc and to live permanently in Canada, work or study anywhere in Canada (without any conditions given to a TRV holder).

 

[Copyright notice: Substantially all information from this article was reproduced from the website of Citizenship and Immigration Canada www.cic.gc.ca for the purpose of providing compiled and brief information about Canadian temporary, and permanent resident visas.  The reproduction has not been produced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada. Any information on this article has been posted with the intent that it be readily available for personal or public non-commercial use and may be reproduced, in part or in whole, and by any means, without charge or further permission, unless otherwise specified by Citizenship and Immigration Canada www.cic.gc.ca. No representation is being made that Citizenship and Immigration Canada is responsible for the accuracy, reliability or currency of the information provided in this article. While due diligence was exercised to ensure the accuracy of the materials reproduced, users wishing to rely upon this information should consult directly with the source of the information; for more and complete information, visit www.cic.gc.ca]

About the Author: Eman is a member of the Integrated Bar of the Philippines and the International Bar Association. Among others, he practices in the fields of corporate, criminal defense, and immigration, and serves as Associate of ICAN (a member of Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council).

Parent and Grandparent Super Visa

Effective 05 November 2011, Citizenship and Immigration Canada has temporarily stopped accepting new applications for the sponsorship of parents and grandparents.  Only applications to sponsor parents and grandparents received before 05 November 2011 will be processed.  This temporary pause in accepting new applications will continue until further notice.  As a result of this temporary pause, applications received on or after 05 November 2011 will be returned and its supporting documents.

However, although Canadian citizens and permanent residents may not apply to sponsor their parent or grandparent for immigration to Canada during this temporary pause, a Parent and Grandparent Super Visa will be available to parent or grandparent who qualify.

What is this Parent and Grandparent Super Visa?

This Super Visa is available only to parent or grandparent of a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada.  The parent or grandparent cannot include dependents in this application, only the spouse or common-law partner of the parent or grandparent is eligible to accompany him or her under this Super Visa.

To apply, the Parent and Grandparent must:

  • be the parent or grandparent of a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada;
  • be found admissible to Canada; and
  • meet certain other conditions.

Visa officers consider several factors before deciding if a person is admissible. The parent or grandparent must be a genuine visitor to Canada who will leave by choice at the end of the visit. Among the things that could be considered are:

  • the person’s ties to the home country;
  • the purpose of the visit;
  • the person’s family and financial situation;
  • the overall economic and political stability of the home country; and
  • an invitation from a Canadian host.

In addition to being found admissible to Canada, the parent or grandparent must also:

  • provide a written commitment of financial support from their child or grandchild in Canada who meets a minimum income threshold;
  • prove that they have bought Canadian medical insurance coverage for at least one year; and
  • complete an Immigration Medical Examination.

If you are a Canadian citizen or permanent resident wishing to apply a Parent or Grandparent Super Visa for your parent or grandparent, you also need to provide:

  • Evidence of the parent or grandparent relationship (e.g., birth certificate, baptismal certificate or other official document);
  • A letter of invitation from you that includes arrangements for care and support;
  • Proof that you meet the Low Income Cut-Off (LICO); and
  • Proof of private medical insurance for the parent or grandparent valid for a minimum of one year from a Canadian insurance company and that:
    • Covers health care, hospitalization and repatriation;
    • Provides a minimum coverage of $100,000; and
    • is valid for each entry to Canada and available for review by a port of entry officer.

What makes the Parent and Grandparent Super Visa different from what is available now as a visitor visa?

Currently, visitors to Canada usually may only visit for six months at a time. Most visitors who wish to stay longer must apply for an extension, and pay a new fee, every six months. With the Parent and Grandparent Super Visa, eligible parents and grandparents will pay fewer fees and have some certainty that they will be able to enjoy the company of their families in Canada for a longer period of time.

CIC will be able to issue the visas, on average, within eight weeks of the application. This means that instead of waiting for eight years, a parent or a grandparent can come to Canada within eight weeks.

 

Is the Parent and Grandparent Super Visa a multi-entry visa? What’s the difference between the Super Visa and the 10-year multiple entry visa?

Yes, the Super Visa is a multi-entry visa that will provide multiple entries for a period up to ten years. The key difference is that the Super Visa will have status periods for each entry that last up to two years, while the 10-year multiple entry visa status period for each entry is six months.

The Super Visa is also available as a single-entry visa, if that is the applicant’s preference.

If parents and grandparents are already in Canada and their visa will be expiring soon, what should they do? Will they be eligible to renew their status from in Canada?

The visa itself is valid for up to 10 years and allows holders to remain in Canada for up to two years at a time. Renewals must be done from outside Canada at a visa office. However, parents and grandparents who hold a valid visa can apply for an extension of their status for up to two years by submitting an application to the Case Processing Centre in Vegreville, Alberta, as long as they meet all the criteria. These applications will be examined on a case by case basis.

[source: www.cic.gc.ca]

 

For ICAN (Canada Immigration)

By Eman Galang

 

Federal Skilled Worker Class: PhD program (Category 3)

Do you know that the Federal Skilled Worker program has a new eligibility stream that is open to international students who are pursuing or who have completed doctoral (PhD) studies at Canadian institutions.

You may be able to apply for this PhD program to become a permanent resident of Canada;

a) If you are an international student currently enrolled in a doctoral (PhD) program, delivered by a recognized post-secondary educational institution located in Canada, and:

•have completed at least two years towards the completion of your PhD,

•are in good academic standing and

•are not a recipient of a Government of Canada award requiring you to return to your home country to apply your knowledge and skills,

OR

b) you have completed a PhD program from a recognized post-secondary educational institution located in Canada no more than 12 months before your application is received by the Centralized Intake Office (CIO) and:

•you have not received a Government of Canada award that requires you to return to your home country to apply your knowledge and skills; or

•if you were a recipient of such an award, you have satisfied the terms/conditions of the award.

[Source: www.cic.gc.ca]

ICAN offers free assessment of your educational qualifications for this program.  For more information, call us at Phone No. 905­564-­99-31 or email us at info@icaninc.ca.

 

By ICAN Inc.

 

India & Canada: Student Partners Program

Do you know that the Federal Government of Canada offers prompt processing of study permit immigration applications for students from India?

This is Canada’s Student Partners Program.

In cooperation with Association of Canadian Community Colleges (ACCC), a group of Canadian educational institutions, students of India will receive prompt processing of applications for study permit.  The student first applies for admission to an ACCC-affiliated college; and once admitted as a student, applications to these colleges will receive prompt processing and a fair and individual decision based on the documentation provided. 

The Student Partners Program is open to Indian nationals only. Students do not apply to the SPP; they apply to a participating college and may be considered under the program if they meet specific criteria. Application submission under the SPP is at the discretion of each participating college. Students interested in submitting applications under the program are encouraged to contact the participating college of their choice for information. The Student Partners Program involves close cooperative partnership and feedback from the participating colleges to ensure student compliance with the terms of their study permits. Essential to the program feedback mechanism is the student’s consent for the institution to provide information on attendance. The student must sign the consent declaration on the SPP checklist in order to be processed under this program.

In most cases, after having completed the required period of study, student graduates maybe able to apply for permanent residence under the Canadian Experience Class.

[Source: www.cic.gc.ca]

ICAN offers free assessment of your educational qualifications for admission to an ACCC-affiliated college and can assist and process for your admission.  For more information, call us at Phone No. 905­564-­99-31 or email us at info@icaninc.ca.

By ICAN Inc.

 

Become a permanent resident by claiming refugee status inside Canada

Are you temporarily in Canada and you don’t want to leave because you fear persecution when you return to your home country as it would subject you to danger of torture, a risk to your life or a risk of cruel and unusual treatment or punishment?

If you feel that you will be persecuted or otherwise at risk as mentioned above if you return to your home country, you may be able to seek protection in Canada as a refugee.  If you are determined to be a refugee, you may be granted permanent residence status in Canada.

Refugees and people needing protection are people in or outside Canada who fear returning to their home country. In keeping with its humanitarian tradition and international obligations, Canada provides protection to thousands of people every year.

Canada offers refugee protection to people in Canada who fear persecution or whose removal from Canada would subject them to a danger of torture, a risk to their life or a risk of cruel and unusual treatment or punishment.

If you are in Canada, you must immediately inform the Immigration Officers that you are claiming Refugee status.  The Officers receiving your refugee claim will decide whether it is eligible for referral to the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB), an independent administrative tribunal that makes decisions on immigration and refugee matters. The IRB decides who is a Convention refugee or a person in need of protection.

Who is a Convention Refugee?

Convention refugees are people who are outside their home country or the country where they normally live, and who are unwilling to return because of a well-founded fear of persecution based on:

•race

•religion

•political opinion

•nationality or

•membership in a particular social group, such as women or people of a particular sexual orientation.

Who is a Person in need of protection

A person in need of protection is a person in Canada whose removal to their home country or country where they normally live would subject them personally to:

•a danger of torture;

•a risk to their life; or

•a risk of cruel and unusual treatment or punishment.

[Source: www.cic.gc.ca]

We can help you apply, claim and process your application for permanent residence as a Refugee; call us at Phone No. 905­564-­99-31 or email us at info@icaninc.ca.  If you are unsure if you are a Refugee status, contact us for a free assessment of your case. 

By ICAN Inc.

 

Lost temporary status in Canada

If any of the following apply to you;

  1. You came to Canada on a valid temporary resident visa (TRV) to visit Canada for a temporary purpose such as tourism, visiting family or friends, or business trips, but remained in Canada longer than the period authorized for your tourist stay.

2.    You came to Canada to study temporarily on a valid study permit but remained in Canada longer than the period authorized for your study. Or you changed the type of studies, educational institution, location of studies, or times and periods of studies without applying to change these conditions on your study permit.

3.    You came to Canada to work temporarily on a valid work permit but remained in Canada longer than the period authorized for your work.  Or you changed employers, type of work, or location of work without applying to change these conditions.

Then, you may have lost your status and have committed an offence under Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and have not abided by the conditions that were imposed when your entry was authorized.

In such case, you; 

  1. May voluntarily leave Canada; or
  2. Can be subject to an admissibility hearing that could lead to your deportation/removal from Canada.

Can you restore and correct your lost status?

Yes, you may seek restoration of your status, only within a certain period, after your status as a visitor, student or worker has been lost, and you continue to meet the initial requirements for your stay and have not failed to comply with any other conditions imposed.

[Source: www.cic.gc.ca]

If you lost your status, we can help you correct or restore your status in Canada; call us at Phone No. 905­564-­99-31 or email us at info@icaninc.ca.

By ICAN Inc.

Temporary foreign worker: Caregiver Work Permit

Caregivers are individuals who are qualified to provide care for children, elderly persons or persons with disabilities in private homes without supervision.  If an application for caregiver work permit is approved by the visa officer, the approved caregiver must live in the private home of their employer in Canada where they will be working.

This is Canada’s ‘Live In Caregiver Program’.

An application for caregiver work permit under the Live In Caregiver Program goes through 3 stages;

First – The qualified caregiver looks for and applies for a caregiver job with a Canadian employer.  If the employer selects him, after due advertisement of the position, the employer and caregiver will sign an employment contract.

Second – The employer applies with the Government of Canada for the approval of the employment relationship.

Third - If approved, the qualified and selected caregiver applies with the visa office for a work permit.  Caregivers found to be eligible and who meet all other requirements will be issued a work permit.

To be able to work in Canada under the Live In Caregiver Program, you must meet the following requirements set by Citizenship and Immigration Canada, among others;

1.    You have successfully completed the equivalent of a Canadian secondary school education

You must have successfully completed the equivalent of Canadian high school education (secondary school). In Canada, generally, it takes 12 years of schooling to obtain a Canadian high school diploma.

2.    You have at least six months’ training OR at least one year of full-time paid work experience as a caregiver or in a related field or occupation (including six months with one employer) in the past three years

a.    Six months training

To claim training, it must have been full-time training in a classroom setting. Areas of study could be early childhood education, geriatric care, pediatric nursing or first aid.

b.    One year of full time paid work experience or in a related field or occupation (ex., Nursing) including six months with one employer in the past three years

To claim work experience, you need to have worked for one year, including at least six months of continuous employment for the same employer. This work experience must be in a field or occupation specific (ie., children, elderly persons or persons with disabilities) to what you will do as a live-in caregiver. This experience must have been acquired within the three years immediately before the day on which you make an application for a work permit as a caregiver.

3.    You have good knowledge of English or French

You must be able to speak, read and understand either English or French so that you can function on your own in your employer’s home. For example, you must be able to call emergency services if they are needed, and to understand labels on medication. You will be unsupervised for most of the day and may have to communicate with someone outside the home. You can also read and understand your rights and obligations if you can function in English or French.

What are the minimum wages and maximum hours of work as a live in caregiver?

It depends on the location of work of the live in caregiver.  See http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/workplaceskills/foreign_workers/advertReq/wageadreq.shtml#tphp.

After working as live in caregiver in Canada, will the live in caregiver be able to apply to become permanent resident of Canada? 

Yes, he may apply for permanent residence with the proper and completed documentation if he; 

  1. Has completed 24 months OR 3,900 hours (within a minimum of 22 months which may include a maximum of 390 hours of overtime) of authorized full-time employment as a live-in caregiver within four years from the date he entered Canada under the Live-in Caregiver Program.
  2. Has always lived in his employer’s home or the home of the person(s) receiving care in Canada while employed as a live-in caregiver

[Source: www.cic.gc.ca]

For more information or free assessment of your qualifications, call us at Phone No. (001)-905­-564-99-31 or email us at info@icaninc.ca.

By ICAN Inc.

Family Class : Sponsoring the permanent residence of your conjugal partner

Do you want to sponsor your partner to come to Canada but has doubts on whether you are qualified to do it because you are not married with him or her, or you are not common-law partners, and you both have been unable to live together continuously for one year, due to circumstances beyond your control, such as immigration barrier, religious reasons, marital status, or sexual orientation?

If you are not married or not in common law relationship with him or her, you can sponsor him if he or she is your Conjugal Partner.

You can sponsor your conjugal partner if there is a significant degree of attachment between the two of you, implying not just a physical relationship but a mutually interdependent relationship, and you have been in a genuine relationship for at least 12 months where marriage or cohabitation has not been possible due to barriers such as sexual orientation, religious faith, etc.

This Conjugal partner category is for foreign national partners of Canadian or permanent resident sponsors who would normally apply as common-law partners but are unable to live together continuously for one year, due to circumstances beyond their control, such as immigration barrier, religious reasons, marital status, or sexual orientation.

In most cases, the foreign partner is also not able to marry their sponsor and qualify as a spouse. In all other respects, the couple is similar to a common-law couple or a married couple, meaning they have been in a bona fide (genuine) conjugal relationship for a period of at least one year.

However, a significant degree of attachment and mutually interdependent relationship must be demonstrated between both partners for this category. They must also provide proof of what obstacles (or restrictions) exist that prevent cohabitation or marriage.

[Source: www.cic.gc.ca]

For more information or free assessment of your qualifications, call us at Phone No. 905­564-­99-31 or email us at info@icaninc.ca.

By ICAN Inc.

Federal Skilled Worker Immigrant Visa

Federal Skilled Worker Immigrant Visa

Did you know that effective July 1, 2011, the Government of Canada has started accepting applications for permanent resident visas under the category Federal Skilled Worker Immigrant Visa from applicants with job experience (at least 1 year for the last 10 years) in the following occupations;

■0631 Restaurant and Food Service Managers

■0811 Primary Production Managers (Except Agriculture)

■1122 Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management

■1233 Insurance Adjusters and Claims Examiners

■2121 Biologists and Related Scientists

■2151 Architects

■3111 Specialist Physicians

■3112 General Practitioners and Family Physicians

■3113 Dentists

■3131 Pharmacists

■3142 Physiotherapists

■3152 Registered Nurses

■3215 Medical Radiation Technologists

■3222 Dental Hygienists & Dental Therapists

■3233 Licensed Practical Nurses

■4151 Psychologists

■4152 Social Workers

■6241 Chefs

■6242 Cooks

■7215 Contractors and Supervisors, Carpentry Trades

■7216 Contractors and Supervisors, Mechanic Trades

■7241 Electricians (Except Industrial & Power System)

■7242 Industrial Electricians

■7251 Plumbers

■7265 Welders & Related Machine Operators

■7312 Heavy-Duty Equipment Mechanics

■7371 Crane Operators

■7372 Drillers & Blasters — Surface Mining, Quarrying & Construction

■8222 Supervisors, Oil and Gas Drilling and Service

The overall applications that will be accepted is 10,000 beginning July 1, 2011 up to June 30, 2012.

Within the 10,000 limit, a maximum of 500 applications per National Occupation Classification (NOC) code.

Basic qualifications to apply for Federal Skilled Worker Visa:

1. WORK – Applicant has at least 1 year work experience (within the last 10 years) in any of the above occupations.

2. EDUCATION – Applicant has educational qualification relating to the occupation under which he is applying.

3. ENGLISH PROFICIENCY – Applicant has completed and passed IELTS English Language Exam.

4. SETTLEMENT FUNDS – Applicant has proof of funds of at least $11,000 to be used by him to support his settlement in Canada. The required funds will increase depending on the number of family members who will accompany the Applicant to Canada once the visa is approved. (Most approved applicants did not bring with them their family to Canada once the visa is given, after few months of settling in Canada they apply for sponsorship of their family members).

If you wish to know more about this opportunity to immigrate to Canada, please email info@icaninc.ca.  Please feel free to forward this note to anyone who maybe interested.

For free, no-cost, worry-free assessment of your qualifications, call us at Phone No. 905­564-99-31 or email us at info@icaninc.ca.

By ICAN Inc.